conventions.rdoc

doc/conventions.rdoc
Last Update: 2017-02-01 07:52:47 -0800

Conventions

This guide goes over conventions for directory layout and file layout for Roda applications. You are free to ignore these conventions, they mostly exist to help users who are unsure how to structure their Roda applications.

Directory Layout

Which directory layout to use should reflect the size of your application.

Small Applications

For a small application, the following directory layout is recommended:

Rakefile
app_name.rb
assets/
migrate/
models.rb
models/
public/
spec/
views/

app_name.rb should contain the Roda application, and should reflect the name of your application. So, if your application is named FooBar, you should use foo_bar.rb.

views/ should contain your template files. This assumes you are using the render plugin and server-side rendering. If you are creating a single page application and just serving JSON, then you won't need a views directory. For small applications, all view files should be in the views directory.

public/ should contain any static files that should be served directly by the webserver. Again, for pure JSON applications, you won't need a public directory.

assets/ should contain the source files for your CSS and javascript assets. If you are not using the assets plugin, you won't need an assets directory.

models.rb should contain all code related to your database/ORM. This file should be required by app_name.rb. This keeps your model code separate from your web code, making it easier to use outside of your web code. It allows you to get an IRB shell for accessing your models via irb -r ./models, without loading the Roda application.

models/ should contain your ORM models, with a separate file per model class.

migrate/ should create your database migration files, if you are using an ORM that uses migrations.

spec/ should contain your specifications/tests. For a small application, it's recommended to a have a single file for your model tests, and a single file for your web/integration tests.

Rakefile should contain the rake tasks for the application. The convention is that the default rake task will run all specs/tests related to the application. If you are using the assets plugin, you should have an assets:precompile task for precompiling assets.

Large Applications

Large applications generally need more structure:

Rakefile
app_name.rb
assets/
helpers/
migrate/
models.rb
models/
public/
routes/
 prefix1.rb
 prefix2.rb
spec/
 models/
 web/
views/
 prefix1/
 prefix2/

For larger apps, the Rakefile, assets/, migrate, models.rb, models/, public/, remain the same.

app_name.rb should use the multi_route and view_subdirs plugin, or the multi_run plugin. The routes used by the multi_route or multi_run should be stored in routing files in the routes/ directory, with one file per prefix.

For specs/tests, you should have spec/models/ and spec/web/, with one file per model in spec/models/ and one file per prefix in spec/web/.

You should have a separate view subdirectory per prefix. If you are using multi_route and view_subdirs, use set_view_subdir in your routing files to specify the subdirectory to use, so it doesn't need to be specified on every call to view.

helpers/ should be used to store helper methods for your application, that you call in your routing files and views. In a small application, these methods should just be specified in app_name.rb

Really Large Applications

For very large applications, it's expected that there will be deviations from these conventions. However, it is recommended to use the multi_route or multi_run plugins to organize your application, and have subdirectories in the routes/ directory, and nested subdirectories in the views/ directory.

Roda Application File Layout

Small Applications

For a small application, the convention in Roda is to layout your Roda application file (app_name.rb) like this:

require 'roda'
require './models'

class AppName < Roda
  SOME_CONSTANT = 1

  use SomeMiddleware

  plugin :render
  plugin :assets

  route do |r|
    # ...
  end

  def view_method
    'foo'
  end
end

You should first require roda and ./models, followed by any other libraries needed by the application.

You should subclass Roda and make the application's name the name of the Roda subclass. Inside the subclass, you first define the constants used by the application. Then you add any middleware used by the application, followed by loading any plugins used by the application. Then you add the route block for the application. After the route block, define the instance methods used in your route block or views.

Large Applications

For larger applications, there are some slight changes to the Roda application file layout:

require 'roda'
require './models'

class AppName < Roda
  SOME_CONSTANT = 1

  use SomeMiddleware

  plugin :render
  plugin :assets
  plugin :view_subdirs
  plugin :multi_route
  Dir['./routes/*.rb'].each{|f| require f}

  route do |r|
    r.multi_route
  end

  Dir['./helpers/*.rb'].each{|f| require f}
end

After loading the view_subdirs and multi_route plugin, you require all of your routing files. Inside your route block, instead of defining your routes, you just call r.multi_route, which will dispatch to all of your routing files. After your route block, you require all of your helper files containing the instance methods for your route block or views, instead of defining the methods directly.